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William Penn and the origins of Pennsylvania wines

Original article published on "The PA Wine Land Post", by PennsylvaniaWine.com.

The story of wine in Pennsylvania is really a tale in two parts. There’s the part you’re probably more familiar with: a dormant period brought on by Prohibition, ended by the passage of the Limited Winery Act in 1968, and followed by a groundswell of growth across the state.

But the first part of this story begins back in 1682 when William Penn sailed from England to the New World with a trove of Bordeaux grapevines in the hold of his ship. In 1683, those vines were planted on what is now called Lemon Hill in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park. The vineyard was a failure — the vinifera grapes (the species of vine that encompasses most popular European varietals) struggled to combat a raft of unfamiliar bugs and diseases. The legacy of these original immigrant grapes was still important: The plants survived long enough to pollinate native vines. These were the first American hybrids, which earned the nickname “wildings.”

The next few decades featured quite a few ambitious viniculture projects in Pennsylvania.

While the vinifera grapes brought to the Colonies continued to struggle, interest in native grapes was growing. In 1767, a farmer named Thomas Livezey, who had a house along Wissahickon Creek, sent a case of wine — made from grapes he found growing on his property — to Benjamin Franklin in England. Franklin shared it around, and reported that tasters found it “excellent.”

In 1768, locally-made wines were exhibited at the American Philosophical Society. The buzz around these wines led to even more experimentation with native grapes. Local entrepreneur John Leacock purchased a 28-acre plantation in Lower Merion Township and planted several varietals. He proposed establishing a “public vineyard” where cuttings would be available to the public for no charge.

Of course, something big was on the horizon — something that would draw Pennsylvanians’ attention away from agricultural and gustatorial pursuits. The American Revolution broke out, the British occupied Philadelphia, and Leacock fled his farm, never to return.

When peace returned, so did the state’s nascent viniculture movement. In 1787, the country’s first commercial vineyard was founded by Pierre Legaux about nine miles northwest of Philadelphia in Spring Mill. The shareholders featured a who’s who of the day, including Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, Johns Hopkins, and Robert Morris.

Like many before him, Legaux tried in vain to get vinifera grapes to thrive. Here’s where the story gets a bit complicated — the winemaker claimed he was successfully growing Constantia, a vine from South Africa, which enabled him to produce his first six barrels in 1793. However, the flourishing plants were actually one of those wilding hybrids: Alexander, a varietal discovered by James Alexander, a gardener for William Penn’s son Thomas. It’s not clear whether Legaux was lying or just confused, but the varietal was a success. He soon had almost 20,000 mature vines and many more in the nursery available for sale.

The eastern edge of the state was not the only site of winemaking. For example, in 1807, the Harmonists, a German religious sect, planted grapes in southwestern PA outside of Pittsburgh. It is still possible to visit the community’s massive stone cellars, which held 30,000 gallons of wine.

By 1900, as the first era of the Commonwealth’s winemaking journey was coming to a close, all 67 counties were making a total of 195,627 gallons of wine. What had begun with a cache of vines in the hold of William Penn’s ship had now become a statewide industry — one that was about to be felled by nationwide Prohibition. Fortunately, we now know that these coming years were just a fallow period, while Pennsylvania prepared for something bigger and better to take root.

Do it for the ‘Gram at these Covered Bridges

With nearly 200 covered bridges across the state, Pennsylvania is home to the most remaining covered bridges in the U.S. Their various architectural styles and classic bold colors set against our natural landscapes make for some amazing shots, so don’t pass up your chance to capture these pastoral throwbacks to rustic Pennsylvania culture. We’re sharing the most Instagram-worthy covered bridges across Pennsylvania for you to map out your next photoshoot.

Knapp’s Covered Bridge

Towanda

Nestled among the mountains of Bradford County, Knapp’s Covered Bridge in Luther Mills is the highest covered bridge in Pennsylvania. It’s the only covered bridge in the county and definitely one not to miss. Completely restored, the bridge sits 30 feet above Brown's Creek. Its natural gray wood, open sides, and spectacular mountain setting make this a favorite of covered bridge fans!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1853, 95 feet long, single span, Burr Arch design

Rishel Covered Bridge

Milton

Rishel Covered Bridge
Rishel Covered Bridge

What better place to start your covered bridge tour than at Pennsylvania’s oldest bridge (and possibly the oldest covered bridge still standing in the U.S.)! Linking East and West Chillisquaque Townships, the Rishel Covered Bridge retains all the charm and history as when it was first built in 1830 and is just waiting for you to stop by and snap a few pictures.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1830, 110 feet long, single span, Burr Truss design

Pomeroy-Academia Covered Bridge

Port Royal

Pomeroy Academia Covered Bridge
Pomeroy-Academia Covered Bridge

The Pomeroy-Academia Covered Bridge in Port Royal has to be at the top of the list of Pennsylvania’s must-see covered bridges; it’s Nearly 300 feet long spanning the scenic Tuscarora Creek, this bridge is considered by some to be the grand show piece of them all, and is the longest covered bridge in the state. Come see why this particular bridge is an especially popular darling of Instagrammers.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1902, 278 feet long, double span, Burr Arch design.

Eric Benjamin Bridge

Bradford

Eric Benjamin Bridge
Eric Benjamin Bridge |
Photo Credit: Visit Allegheny National Forest

Quickly becoming a favorite among covered bridge fans, the Eric Benjamin Bridge in Bradford offers an opportunity to incorporate your visit into a day or weekend spent exploring the surrounding landscape of the Allegheny National Forest. Even though this structure is relatively young by covered bridge standards, its eye-catching diagonal truss design delivers on photo-worthiness. Built in 2004, the bridge spans the cascading waters of the Marilla Reservoir spillway — itself built back in 1898 — and is part of the one-mile Marilla Bridges Trail that circles the reservoir, offering an easy, family friendly hike through the surrounding woodlands.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 2004.

Sachs Bridge

Gettysburg

Sachs Bridge
Sachs Bridge

Sachs Bridge (aka, Saucks Covered Bridge) in Gettysburg is simply brimming with history — and perhaps a ghostly apparition or two! Used by both Union and Confederate soldiers during the Civil War, the bridge sailed about 100 yards down Marsh Creek after some heavy rains hit in 1997. Never fear — the bridge was repaired and placed back on its foundation. Now fully restored and secure, the bridge (with or without its rumored ghosts) invites you to stroll across its storied timbers for a step back in time and some pretty spectacular photos!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1854, 100 feet long, single span, Town Truss design

Martins Mill Covered Bridge

Greencastle

Martins Mill Covered Bridge
Martins Mill Covered Bridge |
Photo Credit: Explore Franklin County

The Martins Mill Covered Bridge in Antrim Township has a different look and feel from most covered bridges you’ll ever see. It was built back in 1849 in a style known as the Town Lattice Truss design, meaning it has no arches or exterior supports, and is the largest lattice type covered bridge still standing in Pennsylvania. Its unique and beautiful design and setting among the woodlands surrounding Conococheague Creek provide some simply stunning photo ops!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1849, 205 feet long, single span, Town Lattice Truss design

Witherspoon Covered Bridge

Mercersburg

Witherspoon Covered Bridge
Witherspoon Covered Bridge |
Photo Credit: Explore Franklin County

Known locally simply as the “Red Bridge,” the Witherspoon Covered Bridge in Montgomery Township is tops 135 years this year, and was clearly built to last — it’s one of the few covered bridges in Pennsylvania that’s still open to vehicular traffic, albeit one car at a time. Relax and soak up some peace on the shores of the slow-moving Licking Creek adjacent to the bridge. Don’t forget to snap a photo or two of its best angles!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1883, 87 feet long, Burr Truss design

Harrity Covered Bridge

Lehighton

Harrity Covered Bridge
Harrity Covered Bridge

For almost 130 years, the Harrity Covered Bridge safely carried travelers over the Pohopoca Creek in Lehighton. In 1970, when the creek was dammed to create Beltzville Lake, the bridge was dismantled and reconstructed on dry land in Beltzville State Park. This sweet little bridge now awaits new travelers in the area to explore the great outdoors. Here’s your chance to take some unique covered bridge photos now that it rests on dry land!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1841, 66 feet long, Burr Arch design

Schofield Ford Covered Bridge

Newtown

Schofield Ford Covered Bridge
Schofield Ford Covered Bridge

The Schofield Ford Covered Bridge (aka, Twinning Ford Bridge) in Tyler State Park in Newtown is a true phoenix risen from the ashes. After the original bridge was destroyed by arsonists in 1991, it was completely rebuilt at the same location using the original plans, specifications, and local wood as the original. Because the rebuilt bridge was left unpainted like the original, snaps of this bridge will have rustic character for days.

Bridge Profile: Originally constructed in 1873, rebuilt in 1997; 170 feet long, double span, Town Truss design

Thomas Mill Covered Bridge

Philadelphia

Thomas Mill Covered Bridge
Thomas Mill Covered Bridge

Philadelphia was the first place in the U.S. with a covered bridge, so it’s fitting that one can still be found within the city limits! While the Thomas Mill Covered Bridge is off the beaten path both literally and figuratively, you’ll enjoy the trek through the beautiful Fairmount Park woodlands to reach it. Painted barn red with stone and spanning the Wissahickon Creek, this quintessential covered bridge is simply picture perfect!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1855, 86.5 feet long, single span, Howe Truss design

Knox Covered Bridge

Malvern

Knox Covered Bridge
Knox Covered Bridge

The Knox Covered Bridge in Tredyffrin Township was built decades after George Washington’s and his troops’ winter encampment. Nevertheless, no trip to historic Valley Forge can be considered complete without taking in this historic and beautiful bridge. Painted white, this distinctive bridge is hard to miss and happens to be the only bridge in the state owned by the federal government.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1865, 65 feet long, single span, Burr Arch design

Packsaddle Covered Bridge

Fairhope

Packsaddle Covered Bridge
Packsaddle Covered Bridge

Considered to be the most scenic covered bridge in Somerset County if not the entire state, Packsaddle Covered Bridge (aka, Doc Miller Covered Bridge) in Fairhope Township does not disappoint! Spanning a natural waterfall formed by a series of small drops along Brush Creek, the setting is almost too scenic for words. At a bit under 50 feet in length, the bridge offers a sweet ride over the creek and the chance for some stunning photos.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1870, 48 feet long, single span, Multiple Kingpost Truss design

Carmichaels Covered Bridge

Carmichaels

Carmichaels Covered Bridge
Carmichaels Covered Bridge

Located a block away from the Old Town section of Carmichaels, Carmichaels Covered Bridge is one of a handful of covered bridges that remains a key part of the vibrant local community. Spanning Muddy Creek, the bridge offers a wonderful glimpse into what life was like in days past when covered bridges were vital conduits for Pennsylvania’s towns and cities. Visit the third weekend in September for the annual Covered Bridge Festival for some great food, fun, and photo ops!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1889, 64 feet long, single span, Queenpost design

King’s Covered Bridge

Rockwood

Kings Covered Bridge
King’s Covered Bridge

Covered bridges were once  known as “kissing bridges” back in the day when young couples would sometimes steal a kiss as they went across. Try it yourself with your favorite someone as you stroll across King’s Covered Bridge in Middlecreek Township. Take advantage of the fact that it’s closed to traffic and take all the time you need to line up the perfect snaps of the bridge’s intricate inner structure!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1906, 127 feet long, single span, Burr Truss design

Shriver Covered Bridge

Rogersville

Shriver Covered Bridge
Shriver Covered Bridge

Get ready to capture beautiful shots of a covered bridge in its natural habitat when you first spy the incredibly picturesque Shriver Covered Bridge. Surrounded by beautiful farms and spanning Hargus Creek in Center Township, this covered bridge comes complete with some of the most classic rural scenery in the state.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1900, 40 feet long, single span, Queenpost design

Claycomb Covered Bridge

Bedford

Claycomb Covered Bridge
Claycomb Covered Bridge

In the mood for a little living history with your covered bridge viewing? Drive across the Claycomb Covered Bridge to Old Bedford Village for a fun and informative step back in time. The bridge itself is almost 140 years old, 95 of which it spent in Reynoldsville before being moved to its new home welcoming visitors in Old Bedford.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1880, 126 feet long, single span, Burr Truss design

St. Mary’s Covered Bridge

Orbisonia

Saint Marys Covered Bridge
St. Mary’s Covered Bridge

It’s impossible to get a bad shot of St. Mary’s Covered Bridge in Shade Gap. And a bonus for those who know their covered bridge architecture, it’s one of only four covered bridges built in the Howe Truss design still standing in Pennsylvania. With its open framework providing views of Shade Creek, this is one bridge that’s a definite must-see.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1889, 65 feet long, single span, Howe Truss design

Jackson’s Sawmill Bridge

Quarryville

Jackson’s Sawmill Bridge
Jackson’s Sawmill Bridge

The Jackson’s Sawmill Covered Bridge (aka, Eichelberger’s Covered Bridge) in Quarryville has a slightly different look than most covered bridges, crossing the west Branch of the Octoraro Creek at an angle rather than straight across. There are photo ops galore with and the interplay of farmland and woods — especially when the trees are all decked out in their fall colors!

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1878, 143 feet long, single span, Double Burr Arch design

East and West Paden Covered Bridges

Orangeville

East and West Paden Covered Bridges
East and West Paden Covered Bridges

You’ll be seeing double the stunning photo opportunities at Twin Bridges Park in Fishing Creek Township. Known as the “Twin Bridges,” the East and West Paden Covered Bridges are truly one-of-a-kind and are the only twin covered bridges in the entire U.S. Though built simultaneously, they differ in size and design.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1884 (but West Paden was reconstructed in 2008 after the original was washed away by flood waters in 2006), 79 feet and 103 feet long, Queen Truss and Burr Arch designs

Kidd's Mill Covered Bridge

Shenango

Kidd's Mill Covered Bridge
Kidd's Mill Covered Bridge

Want to stroll across a covered bridge with no worries of a car or truck suddenly appearing right behind you? The Kidd’s Mill Covered Bridge in Pymatuning Township is open only to foot traffic and sits right next to a beautiful park — perfect for pictures and a picnic lunch! Bonus: The bridge is a true treasure, as it’s the only Type 2 Smith Truss covered bridge still standing in the entire U.S.

Bridge Profile: Constructed in 1868, 125 feet long, single span, Type 2 Smith Truss design

Kreidersville Covered Bridge

Northampton

Kreidersville Covered Bridge
Kreidersville Covered Bridge

Allen Township residents deeply love the Kreidersville Covered Bridge, and we know you will too . They saved it from the wrecking ball, have repaired and maintained it, built a park around it, and throw a biannual festival to celebrate it. The bridge even has its own website! Sit in the nearby gazebo and enjoy views of this beautiful bridge as the Hokendauqua Creek gurgles by.

Bridge Profile: Built in 1839, 116 feet long, single span, and is of the Burr construction with a curved truss support

To learn about more hiking trail adventures, check out the visitPA website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on even more great ideas and places to visit around our state. Don’t forget to never miss an update and sign up for our monthly Happy Thoughts e-newsletter.

10 of the Tallest and Scariest Roller Coasters in Pennsylvania

1. Skyrush

Hersheypark, Hershey

Type: Steel

Height: 200 feet

Speed: 75 mph

Length: 3,600 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 1 minute

Known as the tallest and fastest roller coaster at Hersheypark, this ride is not for the faint of heart! First, you’re propelled up 200 feet of track in just 10 seconds. Next, you crest the hill and plunge down the nearly vertical 85 degrees at 75 mph with forces equal to five Gs. The “ejector airtime” will surely give you the thrill like no other. If that doesn’t get your adrenaline pumping, the next series of four fast, high-banked turns and five airtime hills will, especially for those sitting in the “wing seats.” These seats extend over the edge of the track, are floorless, and are guaranteed to leave you screaming as you realize you’re essentially hanging in mid-air. While the ride is only a minute, it’ll feel like one of the longest, thrill-packed minutes of your life!

2. Steel Force

Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom, Allentown

Type: Steel

Height: 205 feet

Speed: 75 mph

Length: 5,600 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 3 minutes

steel force
Steel Force

Once recognized as one of the best steel roller coasters in the world, you will feel the “force” through this white-knuckle maze with a 205-foot drop, two mystifying tunnels, and dips and turns with speeds reaching 75 miles per hour. At three minutes, Steel Force has the longest ride of any coaster in the region.

3. Phantom’s Revenge

Kennywood, West Mifflin

Type: Steel

Height: 160 feet

Speed: 85 mph

Length: 3,365 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 1 minute, 45 seconds

roller coaster Phantoms Revenge Kennywood
Phantom’s Revenge

Climb aboard Phantom’s Revenge (if you dare!) and get ready to go faster than you’re legally allowed on any Pennsylvania highway! But first, prepare to climb, and climb, and then climb some more past the treetops until you’re perched 160 feet in the air with a true bird’s eye view of the park and surrounding area. Next, you’re screaming down and around the track at 85 mph, hurtling through other rides in some “headchopper” moments, thrown into laterals, and plummeted down into one of the park’s steep ravines, all while enjoying some serious airtime on the ride’s many hills and wondering if your adrenaline rush will ever wear off!

4. Fahrenheit

Hersheypark, Hershey

Height: 121 feet

Speed: 58 mph

Length: 3,198 feet

Inversions: 6

Ride Duration: 1 minute, 25 seconds

roller coaster Farenheit
Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit’s claim to fame is the 97-degree first drop. The looping roller coaster ascends 90 degrees, 121-foot lift before plummeting down for a memorable drop. Ready for more? The coaster’s packed layout features six inversions and plenty of airtime. The Norwegian Loop, Cobra Roll, and Double Corkscrew will keep your head spinning for days.

5. Hydra the Revenge

Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom, Allentown

Type: Steel

Height: 105 feet

Speed: 53 mph

Length: 3,198 feet

Inversions: 7

Ride Duration: 2 minutes, 35 seconds

Hydra the Revenge
Hydra the Revenge

The floor drops, the front gate opens, and the ride is deceptively slow for the first several feet and you begin to wonder, just what is so scream-worthy about this ride. Just then, you’re launched through a 360-degree Jojo Roll. Then, with just enough time to calm your nerves and close your mouth, you’re climbing a 95-foot hill and six more crazy rolls — just passing inches above the boulder-strewn ground. How are your screaming abilities and coaster mettle, now? Congratulations for surviving Hydra’s more than half mile of coiling steel!

6. Ravine Flyer II

Waldameer & WaterWorld, Erie

Type: Wood-Steel Hybrid

Height: 85 feet

Speed: 60 mph

Length: 2,900 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 1 minute, 30 seconds

Ravine Flyer 2
Ravine Flyer II

Ravine Flyer II made quite the debut in 2008, winning Amusement Today’s Golden Ticket award for the world’s Best New Ride. It’s no wonder: this hybrid coaster has almost everything adrenaline aficionados crave: speed, hills with plenty of out-of-your-seat airtime, great track-banking curves and turns — and, if that’s not enough — six darkened tunnels and a 165-foot-long arched bridge that sends you flying over a four-lane highway below — guaranteed to get you smiling and screaming!

7. Phoenix

Knoebels Amusement Resort, Elysburg

Length: 3,200 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 2 minutes

Phoenix
Phoenix

Don’t be fooled and think this is a tame ride. It’s anything but, offering some of the best airtime you’ll find on any coaster — the reason why coaster enthusiasts from across the globe have rated the Phoenix the second-best wooden roller coaster in the world. With its “double out and back” layout, this classic Philadelphia Toboggan Coaster shoots up and then plunges down hills of different sizes, whips through horseshoe curves, and offers the sensation of almost continuous airtime, delivering a ride that’s definitely scream-worthy!

8. Storm Runner

Hersheypark, Hershey

Type: Steel

Height: 150 feet

Speed: 75 mph

Length: 2,600 feet

Inversions: 3

Ride Duration: 50 seconds

storm runner
Storm Runner

Are you ready for speed? The Storm Runner will launch you from 0-72 mph in two seconds flat. Before you even know what happened, you are shot up the 150-foot-tall “top hat” element providing some airtime and then straight down 180 feet. Next, the coaster climbs and rolls left into the “Cobra Loop” followed by several other rolls before hitting on the magnetic breaks and jerking the riders forward at a complete stop. Breathless? So are we!

9. Blue Streak

Conneaut Lake Park, Conneaut Lake

Type: Wooden

Height: 77 feet

Speed: 50 mph

Length: 2,900 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 2 minutes, 20 seconds

birds eye view Blue streak roller coaster ride
Blue Streak

The Blue Streak is 80 years young this year and has been described by some as “charming” with its simple out and back design, but don’t be fooled thinking this grand dame of Pennsylvania coasters offers a quiet, genteel ride. Blue Streak is just waiting to show you how she can still keep up with those youngster coasters and deliver quite the thrill-packed, scream-worthy ride with some decent airtime. Who ever thought an 80-year-old (coaster) could be this fast and exciting?

10. Thunderbolt

Kennywood, West Mifflin

Type: Wooden

Height: 70 feet

Speed: 55 mph

Length: 3,250 feet

Inversions: 0

Ride Duration: 1 minute, 48 seconds

thunderbolt roller coaster ride
Thunderbolt

As you climb aboard Thunderbolt, you might be tempted to expect the usual coaster ride where you exit the station, climb up the steepest hill, then zoom down to gain momentum for the rest of the ride’s tricks and turns. Not this time! Instead of going up, you’re immediately plunging down into a 40‐foot ravine. Roaring up the ravine’s other side, the ride makes a sharp right-hand turn and then you’re climbing one of a series of hills — each larger than the one before and saving the best for last with a nearly 100-foot drop!

Did You Know: Kennywood is celebrating it’s 120th anniversary!

Special Note: Dedicated roller coaster enthusiasts (and even those who aren’t) will want to journey to Lakemont Park in Altoona in 2019 for the park’s reopening and reincarnation to experience Leap-the-Dips, which is the world’s oldest roller coaster, America's last side friction roller coaster still in operation, and a National Historic Landmark.

Coaster lingo for the budding enthusiasts:

G-force: An abbreviation for gravitational force a measurement of the type of acceleration that causes a perception of weight.
Negative g-force (aka airtime): Is experienced when you accelerate downwards faster than the rate of natural freefall, often resulting in a feeling of weightlessness.
Golden Ticket: Each year, the Golden Ticket Awards ranks the best steel and wooden roller coasters in the world. The awards are presented by Amusement Today, is a monthly periodical featuring news on amusement parks and rides. They rely on a panel of voters from all around the world consisting of experienced park enthusiasts.
Inversion: A roller coaster element in which the track turns riders upside-down and then returns them to an upright position.
Jojo roll: The Jojo roll at Dorney Park is the first-ever pre-lift hill inversion where riders twist upside-down after exiting the launch station.

Want more coaster action? Check out the 40+ roller coasters at Pennsylvania’s Amusement Parks Association website, which are geared to all ages and thrill levels. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on even more great ideas and places to visit around our state. Don’t forget to never miss an update and sign up for our monthly Happy Thoughts e-newsletter.

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